Mercury Recording Equipment

/Mercury Recording Equipment

Technology is taking us to new places in recording. But for successfully capturing great recordings that technology needs a helpful hand… from the past. Nothing sounds as good as the American and European tube equipment from the 50s and 60s. Full of warmth, air and musicality. As well, there was short period (late 60s to the early 70s) when the American and European Discrete, Solid State equipment was also wonderful sounding.

Mercury Recording Equipment Co. was started in 2000 by David Marquette who you may know from Marquette Audio Labs in Hayward, CA. After dealing with vintage equipment and racking vintage modules for many years David felt it was time to build some the great equipment of the past from scratch that were not truly available to most people. The first three products (M.66, EQ-H and EQ-P) were helped brought to life by David Bock, who you may know from his great work at Soundelux Microphones. But you might not know David Bock is a highly experienced studio technician and has worked in such places as Hit Factory (NYC) and Ocean way (LA). For studios like those, the in-house microphone and outboard equipment collection is perhaps their most important asset. But they also need constant maintenance to keep them up and running. David Bock got the experience “in the field” (i.e. in the most professional studios) where the equipment we call “Pro Audio” are the essential tools for creating recordings on a daily basis.

Mercury website

  • Same Mercury Power Structure, still ready for Mercury G8 Modules. Same PSU-1 & 6 ft. power cable. No CHAIN Switch, LINK sequentially Only (1-2, 3-4, etc...) on CH 1-10, XLR I/O on CH 9-10 only, DB25 I/O on CH 1-8 only. Ships as Rack Mount Version. Tabletop Kit extra.
    Available June 2014

  • All the Bells and Whistles. LINK and CHAIN on CH 1-10, XLR I/O on CH 1-10, DB25 I/O on CH 1-8, PSU-1, 6 ft. power cable, Mercury Power Structure and ready for Mercury G8 Modules. Ships as Tabletop Version. Rack Ear Kit extra.

  • Tube 1ch M72s and 1ch M76m

    The Mercury Brüder combines one M72s channel and one M76m channel in a single 3U package. This unit is now available from our Custom Shop (special order).

    Both channels are multipurpose tools for making music.

    The Mercury M72s is warm and punchy, with a thick bottom end, a great push in the mid range and a open airy top end. The M72s performs great on vocals, bass, drums, acoustic and electric guitars, as well as room and overhead applications.

    The M76m is warm, open and airy. Compared to the M72s, the M76m is overall more evenly "EQ'ed," meaning there is not a push in the low or mids. The M76m shines on vocals, bass and guitars (you have amazing control on the amplifier's tone), and opens up your room and overhead mics. With 72dB (+/-) of total gain and a choice of high or low input impedance — ribbon mics are big and open with the M76m.

    The M72s has 58dB of gain and the M76m has about 72dB of gain (60dB input gain, +6dB(+/-) of level control and +6dB when low impedance is selected).

  • In the mid-sixties, at Abbey Road Studios legends were born. Not just the Beatles or George Martin, but also the REDD.37 recording desk that was used to record most of their earlier work. The very rare amplifiers used in that desk were called "V72s" and were a modified version of the standard Telefunken / Siemens V72 module.

    The more common V72 amplifier modules were later modified and have been sold for many years as outboard preamplifiers all over the world. These V72 modules have not been available new for 40 years, and working units have become extremely rare and expensive. It is the uniquely musical tonal characteristics of these preamps have made them the prized possession of many engineers lucky enough to get the vintage modules, and a "secret weapon" for many studio musicians. With that in mind, Mercury Recording Equipment has made a faithful reproduction in the M72s -- not only of how the units behave, but of how they SOUND overall. The addition of pad, phase, phantom and gain controls make it even more versatile without sacrificing the most important feature: Musicality.

    After building 100's of Vintage V72 packages at Marquette Audio Labs it is nice to know we can continue a tradition that we have been providing for over 10 years now. We are very proud of the Mercury M72s Studio Microphone Amplifiers at M.A.L. and I am personally very pleased with this product which has actually exceeded my expectations.

  • First, Mercury Recording Equipment Co. successfully recreated the original V72s with the highly regarded Mercury M72s. Now, with the Mercury M76m, we have brought to life the V72s' "big brother" - the V76. The Mercury M76m is a recreation of the original German designed Telefunken / Siemens amplifier module used in many European broadcast and recording desks. The V76 modules, however, are more well known as an outboard rack mounted preamp and are highly sought after by studios and engineers all over the world. Of all the V76 amplifiers, the "V76m" has always been the most desired because of its useful variable gain control, (as well as no filters intended for broadcast use). Original V76 modules have not been available new for 40 years and working vintage units have become extremely rare and expensive. Furthermore, due to its overly compact modular design, the V76 modules are now, after four decades, not as mechanically sound as they once were which causes problems sonically.
  • M76m Studio Microphone Amplifier with EQ-P1 Studio Program Equalizer

    New from the Mercury Custom Shop is Mercury’s twist on the professional studio channel, the Mercury Studio Channel 76. The MSC-76 is two independent channels of a Mercury M76m Studio Microphone Amplifier and a Mercury EQ-P1 Program Equalizer. Both amplifiers (the microphone amplifier and EQ’s gain make up amplifier) are fully transformer balanced, with the option to use them together or independently with separate XLR inputs and outputs on the rear of chassis. The MSC-76 is simply two great Mercury products in one 3U chassis.

    Looking at other choices of "combo boxes," especially ones with compressors along with pre-amps and EQs, choosing to cut corners to either be able to save costs, which usually means less transformers, and or to save space to be able to fit all the components in the products chassis, we wanted to do something much different. Unlike many "channel strips" or "combo boxes" in the marketplace, no corners were cut in the Mercury Studio Channel 76 (or our other Studio Channel – the Mercury Studio Channel 72).

     
  • M72s Studio Microphone Amplifier with EQ-H1 Studio Program Equalizer

    The M72s is based on the most sought after vintage "V series" module, the ‘Telefunken/Siemens V72s,’ which is most famous for being used in REDD.37 consoles used on the early Beatles recordings by George Martin at Abbey Road Studios in London, England.

    Unlike those vintage modules that had a fixed 34dB gain, The gain of the Mercury M72s is variable from 28dB to 58dB, in 3dB increments. Also, there is an option of a selectable Input Pad of -16dB or -28dB for even more control. When the -28dB pad is engaged and it is set at the lowest gain setting (28dB) you can run line level signal through the M72s to add warmth and tonality to any tracks, mixes, keyboards, drum machines, samples etc... There are also all the modern features we expect on a new piece of equipment: Phantom Power (on/off) , Phase (Polarity) Reversal, and our amazing sounding F.D.I. (FET Direct Input) Circuit.

    After building 100's of Vintage V72 packages at Marquette Audio Labs it is nice to know we can continue a tradition that we have been providing for over 10 years now. We are very proud of the Mercury M72s Studio Microphone Amplifiers at M.A.L. and I am personally very pleased with this product which has actually exceeded my expectations.

    David Marquette, Mercury Recording Equipment/Marquette Audio Labs
  • I used the EQ-P1 and EQ-H1 extensively in mixing scenarios, and they performed like champs. I was able to dial in silky top-end on vocals and acoustic guitars and beefy lows on kick drums and mic'd bass cabinets with truly 'pro' results. There were many times when i hit upon a certain setting and found it was 'that sound' I had heard for years on 'that famous record' that didn't seem possible to get with 'other gear'. These EQs are so perfectly geared to music that - even with extreme settings - it's hard to get bad results with them.

    Pete Weiss, TapeOp Magazine

    The Mercury EQ-H1, EQ-P1, EQ-H2 and EQ-P2 are all based on the original Pultec equalizers which were tools developed to deal with the limitations of recorded music. Limitations that most often manifest themselves in the highest and lowest frequencies of the program material. The Mercury Studio Program Equalizers, like the family of original Pultec EQs, are originally designed to bring back the life and musicality lost in a recording. Whether by accident or genius, nothing has been able to do this better in music production than a passive equalizer with tube gain make up amplifier (‘Pultec style’) equalizer. The interaction of the passive boosting and attenuating shelving EQs (not relying on negative feedback), as well as the transformers, tubes and other amplification circuitry all add to the incredibly musical character of the product. Working engineers try other types of equalizers, but always end up coming back to the Pultec style as the equalizer of choice for those final touches while tracking or mixing and even mastering at times.

  • After many years custom racking ‘Vintage BBC Spec’ console input modules and having the luxury of being able to hear just about every one of the discrete British Pre/EQ modules ever made... one has always seemed to shine above the rest, for me, due to its silky smooth tone and overall musicality, the Vintage Calrec PQ15s. I am thrilled to be able to share this old favorite, in a new way and with some additional features in our Mercury Grand PreQ15s.

    David Marquette, Mercury Recording Equipment Co.

    The Mercury Grand PreQ15s is a fully discrete mono studio channel with 3-band equalizer, high & low pass filters and fully balanced transformer coupled inputs and outputs. The GPQ15s has many additions to the classic circuit as well as all the modern features you will require packed into a solidly built 1U chassis. The Mercury GPQ15s boasts premium components, custom transformers, and is proudly built in the USA. The GPQ15s comes with an external premium quality power supply, the Mercury DC-1.

    The Mercury Grand PreQ15s (GPQ15s) Studio Channel contains theMercury Grand Pre Microphone Amplifier, Line Input Amplifier, Response Selection, High and Low Frequency Filter Circuits and Output Level Control.

  • I used the EQ-P1 and EQ-H1 extensively in mixing scenarios, and they performed like champs. I was able to dial in silky top-end on vocals and acoustic guitars and beefy lows on kick drums and mic'd bass cabinets with truly 'pro' results. There were many times when i hit upon a certain setting and found it was 'that sound' I had heard for years on 'that famous record' that didn't seem possible to get with 'other gear'. These EQs are so perfectly geared to music that - even with extreme settings - it's hard to get bad results with them.

    Pete Weiss, TapeOp Magazine

    The Mercury EQ-H1, EQ-P1, EQ-H2 and EQ-P2 are all based on the original Pultec equalizers which were tools developed to deal with the limitations of recorded music. Limitations that most often manifest themselves in the highest and lowest frequencies of the program material. The Mercury Studio Program Equalizers, like the family of original Pultec EQs, are originally designed to bring back the life and musicality lost in a recording. Whether by accident or genius, nothing has been able to do this better in music production than a passive equalizer with tube gain make up amplifier (‘Pultec style’) equalizer. The interaction of the passive boosting and attenuating shelving EQs (not relying on negative feedback), as well as the transformers, tubes and other amplification circuitry all add to the incredibly musical character of the product. Working engineers try other types of equalizers, but always end up coming back to the Pultec style as the equalizer of choice for those final touches while tracking or mixing and even mastering at times.

  • The Mercury EQ-H1 features a passive EQ circuit with a single ended gain make up amplifier topology, based on the vintage ‘Pultec EQH’ circuit. The Mercury EQ-H1 circuit provides a musically satisfying result unobtainable with active and parametric EQs, since it does not rely upon negative feedback (and all its associated phase and dynamic distortions) to achieve equalization. The EQ-H1, like all Mercury products, has transformer balanced (XLR) input and outputs. The only modern additions or changes to the original are a much more powerful and stable power supply and running DC on the heaters, rather than AC, and two additional frequencies to expand the range and make it more flexible.
  • In the mid-sixties, at Abbey Road Studios legends were born. Not just the Beatles or George Martin, but also the REDD.37 recording desk that was used to record most of their earlier work. The very rare amplifiers used in that desk were called "V72s" and were a modified version of the standard Telefunken / Siemens V72 module.

    The more common V72 amplifier modules were later modified and have been sold for many years as outboard preamplifiers all over the world. These V72 modules have not been available new for 40 years, and working units have become extremely rare and expensive. It is the uniquely musical tonal characteristics of these preamps have made them the prized possession of many engineers lucky enough to get the vintage modules, and a "secret weapon" for many studio musicians. With that in mind, Mercury Recording Equipment has made a faithful reproduction in the M72s -- not only of how the units behave, but of how they SOUND overall. The addition of pad, phase, phantom and gain controls make it even more versatile without sacrificing the most important feature: Musicality.

  • In the mid-sixties, at Abbey Road Studios legends were born. Not just the Beatles or George Martin, but also the REDD.37 recording desk that was used to record most of their earlier work. The very rare amplifiers used in that desk were called "V72s" and were a modified version of the standard Telefunken / Siemens V72 module.

    The more common V72 amplifier modules were later modified and have been sold for many years as outboard preamplifiers all over the world. These V72 modules have not been available new for 40 years, and working units have become extremely rare and expensive. It is the uniquely musical tonal characteristics of these preamps have made them the prized possession of many engineers lucky enough to get the vintage modules, and a "secret weapon" for many studio musicians. With that in mind, Mercury Recording Equipment has made a faithful reproduction in the M72s -- not only of how the units behave, but of how they SOUND overall. The addition of pad, phase, phantom and gain controls make it even more versatile without sacrificing the most important feature: Musicality.

  • First, Mercury Recording Equipment Co. successfully recreated the original V72s with the highly regarded Mercury M72s. Now, with the Mercury M76m, we have brought to life the V72s' "big brother" - the V76. The Mercury M76m is a recreation of the original German designed Telefunken / Siemens amplifier module used in many European broadcast and recording desks. The V76 modules, however, are more well known as an outboard rack mounted preamp and are highly sought after by studios and engineers all over the world. Of all the V76 amplifiers, the "V76m" has always been the most desired because of its useful variable gain control, (as well as no filters intended for broadcast use). Original V76 modules have not been available new for 40 years and working vintage units have become extremely rare and expensive. Furthermore, due to its overly compact modular design, the V76 modules are now, after four decades, not as mechanically sound as they once were which causes problems sonically.